3 Ways To Avoid Burnout At The End of The Season

By Alex Comstock 

If you're a hardcore bowhunter, the end of the season can sometimes produce a bit of a "burnout". Depending on how your season has played out to this point, the level of burnout can vary. If your season has been anything like mine, where nothing has seemed to go right, you may be more susceptible to be feeling worn out. Lately, I've been feeling a little burnt out, and haven't been hunting much at all. It's definitely time for that to change. There's still time to fill your tag, and if you're feeling a bit burnt out like I am, here are a few ways to snap out of it, or avoid the feeling completely. 

1. Cherish The Time You Have to Hunt

At the end of the day, we only get so much time to spend chasing whitetails. Between work, family, and just life, every second spent in the field should be cherished, and not taken for granted. Even if you've spent a lot of time in the woods this year, season will be over before you know it. I'd be willing to bet that a week after season is over, you'll be killing to get out in a treestand. While you've still got time to be out there, treasure every moment. Don't make it about having to kill a big buck, but rather about being able to enjoy the time you have to hunt. 

2. Shoot a Doe

Burnout is usually caused by a combination of putting pressure on yourself, and not having success. Head out for an evening of hunting in a spot where you want to shoot a doe. A night of hunting where you don't feel as much pressure and having the chance to send an arrow at a doe could rejuvenate you. At the end of the day, a successful hunt, and having to go through the process of tracking a deer, cutting it up, and everything that goes into a harvest, regardless if it's a big buck or not could be what you need. Late season is a great time to fill the freezer with venison, and it may help you avoid that burnout feeling.

3. Introduce Someone New To Hunting

If you're feeling worn out at all, introducing someone new to hunting might be enough to create that spark that gets you re-excited. If you're going to go this route, one thing you may want to be thinking of is the conditions. For example, a couple seasons ago when I was starting to feel burnt out about this time of year, I thought it would be a good time to introduce my girlfriend to bowhunting. I convinced her to come out with me, and see what it was all truly about. What I wasn't thinking about was how cold it was that day. With the wind chill, it was near below zero, and even though I wasn't fazed, she had one hell of a time. Long story short, we spent about an hour in the blind and had to head home. I thought it was awesome she came out with me, and it got me pumped up, but I should have waited until it was a nicer day. 

For you, if you've got a mild and warm late season day, it could be a great time to introduce someone new to hunting. Whether it be your spouse, child, or friend, getting someone new into hunting could alleviate any feeling of burnout you may feel otherwise. 

Conclusion

Pursuing whitetails can be a lot of work. When you take it as serious as most of us do, it can be mentally taxing, especially if you're having a rough year. Late in the year, if you are feeling worn out mentally at all, give one of these things a try to avoid it. Just remember, season will be after before you know it, and once it is, you'll be wishing it wasn't over!

5 Reasons You Should Still Be Hunting

5 Reasons You Should Still Be Hunting

By Alex Comstock

If you've been hunting hard all year, it could be easy to be mentally drained and "hunted out". For some, it could even be to the extent where you hardly hunt at the end of the year, even if you haven't filled your tag. So much effort goes into hunting the rut, by the time late season arrives, you might just want to call it quits for the year. But if you've still got a tag to fill, I urge you to keep at it. Late season hunting can be tough, I agree with that, but it can also produce some fantastic hunting. Here's why you should be staying after it. 

Late Season Hunting - 3 Things Not to Forget About

Late Season Hunting - 3 Things Not to Forget About

By Alex Comstock 

Only a couple precious November days are left before December rolls in. The month of December always signals the start of a new season for me. That's the late season. There's a lot that changes during late season hunting, but if you do it right, it can be some of the best hunting of the year. For me personally, I've shot three out of my last five bucks during the month of December, so maybe I've just got a slight affinity for it. Regardless, here are three things that I think are easy to forget about, and if you do, they can hinder your chances of sending an arrow through a late season buck. 

3 Under The Radar Tactics To Harvest a Mature Buck During The Back Half of November

3 Under The Radar Tactics To Harvest a Mature Buck During The Back Half of November

By Alex Comstock 

November is already half way over. Pretty crazy huh? It seems that all year, we dream about this month, and then in a flash, it's already almost over. Don't let that get your hopes down though if you haven't shot a buck yet. The back half of November doesn't get as much publicity or love as the front half, but there are definitely bucks to be killed, and the rut is by no means over. What you might have to do though is switch up your tactics. Here's three under the radar tactics that might just work for you in the next couple of weeks. 

Working Hard to Be Successful on Public Land with Curtis Zabel

Working Hard to Be Successful on Public Land with Curtis Zabel

By Alex Comstock 

Hunting public land presents challenges like none other when it comes to pursuing mature bucks. The hunters that are consistently successful usually possess common traits, and one of those I've found to be is simply working harder than every one else. One person that I've continually been impressed with is Curtis Zabel from Behind the Bow. To learn a little more about what makes him tick, and his work ethic that helps make him successful on public land, read our Q&A below. 

Don't Forget About the Little Things During The Rut

Don't Forget About the Little Things During The Rut

By Alex Comstock 

The rut is a busy time of the year for most whitetail hunters. All day sits, running out to a stand for an hour after work, road trips, long days and short nights, and the list could go on and on. The month of November is something we look forward to during the eleven other months of the year almost as much as anything. Yet, when the time finally comes, and you start to get busy and tired, corners are cut and it's easy to stop doing the little things that can ultimately decide whether or not you end up at the end of a blood trail. 

Don't Let Social Media Fool You - You're Not The Only One Who Hasn't Shot a Big Buck

Don't Let Social Media Fool You - You're Not The Only One Who Hasn't Shot a Big Buck

By Alex Comstock 

Social media can be awesome. It allows you to connect with other like minded individuals from all over the country. You can share stories of your hunts, see how others are doing, and learn from others. But social media does have its drawbacks, and one of those is it can often seem like everybody is shooting a big buck - except you. 

Four Things to Think About When Calling during the Pre-Rut

Four Things to Think About When Calling during the Pre-Rut

By Alex Comstock 

Across much of the country, a well timed cold front is blowing through here at the end of October. Cold temps, late October, and more mature buck movement signifies one thing - the rut is on the horizon. The "pre-rut" or the time of the year when does aren't necessarily ready to breed yet, but bucks are starting to ramp up is officially here. Subsequently, there will be more antlers rattled together and grunt tubes blown on in the next month than the rest of the year. 

How to Utilize Last Seasons Trail Camera Data to Fill This Years Tag

How to Utilize Last Seasons Trail Camera Data to Fill This Years Tag

By Alex Comstock 

Hunting mature buck requires a level of educated guessing at times. You guess wrong and live and learn, or you guess right and high five at the end of a blood trail (hopefully!). Where this really shows itself is with historical trail camera data. Knowing what bucks have done in the past could lead you down a path to success right now.